Bark Basket

Description: 

Rigid, rough bark. One piece sewn in at sides with double cord. Willow twig sewn inside top edge. Strip of cedar bark ties ends of willow together in two places.,height: 17 3/4"; Width at Bottom: 14"

Original Date: 
1910-1938
Language: 
English
Rights: 
Copyright for permission to reproduce Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture/Eastern Washington State Historical Society Spokane, Washington
Source: 
AI Collection
Publisher: 
EWSHS/MAC
Identifier: 
MAC_12132
Type: 
Format: 
Author: 
admin
Description: 

One of the many baskets that were traded with the nuns at the boarding school.

Cultural Narrative: 

 The bark is folded and sewn. It could have been that the students’ families were paying Sister Providencia their own way, with the gifts. They would still have secret jump dances up on the mountain then. Joyce Swan

The nuns would cook and give the food out the back to the families from the camp. I still remember they had to bring in all their cultural materials there and turn them into the missionaries. Leta Campbell

We take the strips off the tree. There are only two times of the year you can get the bark off that way. Leanne Campbell

They get the bark at the wet time of year. They gather the bark first, then when you get it ready by first drying it and then when you get ready to make it you re-wet it and then bend it and then stitch it together. This one stitched together with string. Some are made quickly to use right away and others made more slowly for use later or for sale, or trade. Philomena Nome

Title: 
Bark Basket
Identifier: 
MAC_12132_CDA
Author: 
admin