Cornhusk Storage Bag

Description: 

Rectangular, flat, twined, cornhusk, storage bag. Dyed, green and yellow, and blue and red geometric designs. Drawstring closure. Hemp and cotton weft at top and base, balance cornhusk., height: 20 1/4"; Width at Top: 12 1/4"; Width at Bottom: 14 5/8",

Original Date: 
1900-1925
Language: 
English
Rights: 
Copyright for permission to reproduce Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture/Eastern Washington State Historical Society Spokane, Washington
Source: 
AI Collection
Publisher: 
EWSHS/MAC
Identifier: 
MAC_27167
Type: 
Format: 
Author: 
admin
Cultural Narrative: 

This one is corn husk all the way through except for the weft is cotton and hops string. They used these to store mostly food in it. The Indian help was supposed to be mildew resistant. The triangular shape design is the old style. It’s not uniform, so you can tell it is more natural dye. You'd think it would be made before 1930s, because you didn't really see a white influence and the colors are older. Elaine Emerson

Traditional Knowledge: 

They'd put all their food in there and tie it up and keep it in there. In the old days they'd use them at marriage ceremonies. The boy’s father would bring the bags all full, what they were paying for that girl. Then the girl’s family would do the same and it was like a challenge. Elaine Emerson

Title: 
Cornhusk Storage Bag
Contributor: 
Identifier: 
MAC_27167_COL
Author: 
admin